political ecology

Earth First! A Citizen’s Guide to the U.S. Forest Service: Managing for Extinction

This Earth First! tabloid describes negative impacts of the U.S. Forest Service on national forests. Topics include reform proposals for the USFS, the role of deep ecology, the destruction of eco-systems across the U.S., abuse of Native American cultural heritage, and a call for the protection of national forests.

The State of Nature: Ecology, Community, and American Social Thought, 1900–1950

Gregg Mitman examines the relationship between issues in early twentieth-century American society and the sciences of evolution and ecology to reveal how explicit social and political concerns influenced the scientific agenda of biologists at the University of Chicago and throughout the United States during the first half of the twentieth century.

The Ecology of Home

About this issue

This essay examines environmental thought in China and the West to propose an “ecological history” that offers new ways to think about the human/nature relationship.

Content

International Organizations and Environmental Protection: Conservation and Globalization in the Twentieth Century

International Organizations and Environmental Protection comprehensively explores the environmental activities of professional communities, NGOs, regional bodies, the United Nations, and other international organizations during the twentieth century. It follows their efforts to shape debates about environmental degradation, develop binding intergovernmental commitments, and—following the seminal 1972 Conference on the Human Environment—implement and enforce actual international policies.

In the Name of the Great Work: Stalin's Plan for the Transformation of Nature and its Impact in Eastern Europe

Beginning in 1948, the Soviet Union launched a series of wildly ambitious projects to implement Joseph Stalin’s vision of a total “transformation of nature.” By the time of Stalin’s death, however, these attempts at “transformation” had proven a spectacular failure. This richly detailed volume, In the Name of the Great Work follows the history of such projects in three communist states—Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia—and explores their varied, but largely disastrous, consequences.