Content Index

This article examines early twentieth-century China’s top-down scheme of managing rivers based on watershed.

From channelizations to renaturations—the catastrophic flood of the Gürbe River in July 1990 prompted profound changes in approaches to flood protection.

This article shows how rural collective action in tropical Australia transformed plantations into small farms in the late nineteenth century.

This article examines the development of lake Ohrid in Macedonia, and the dilemma between environmental protection and the expansion of mass tourism on the lake’s fragile shores.

In the United States, debate over the responsibilities of different levels of government are framed within our system of constitutional federalism, which divides sovereign power between the central federal administration and regional states. Dilemmas about devolution have been erupting in all regulatory contexts, but environmental governance remains uniquely prone to federalism discord because it inevitably confronts the core question with which federalism grapples—“who gets to decide?”— in contexts where state and federal claims to power are simultaneously at their strongest.

Erin Ryan argues that environmental law is uniquely prone to federalism discord because it inevitably confronts the core question with which federalism grapples—who gets to decide?—in contexts where state and federal claims to power are simultaneously at their strongest.

This article introduces a case for engaging with religious worldviews which can support the cause for environmental justice.

This article examines transformations in the meaning and value of Voacanga africana.

This article analyzes the recent controversial environmental history of urban parks in Istanbul, Turkey, and Budapest, Hungary, under authoritarian regimes.

Biodiversity offsetting and the contradictions of the capitalist production of nature in England.