Content Index

An unexpected group of activists, consisting of mostly farmers and vintners, occupied the construction site of a nuclear reactor near the German town of Wyhl in 1975.

Lestel, Bussolini, and Chrulew present a bi-constructivist approach to the study of animal life, opposed to the realist-Cartesian paradigm in which most ethology operates.

A photograph of Theodore Roosevelt visiting the Nahuel Huapi National Park in Argentina, 1913.

Greg Garrard, Gary Handwerk, and Sabine Wilke, editors of the special section titled "Imagining Anew: Challenges of Representing the Anthropocene," introduce this collection of essays from diverse humanities disciplines.

In the special section "Imagining Anew: Challenges of Representing the Anthropocene," Tobias Boes examines the hermeneutic and poetic operations by which we as human beings turn our very planet into a signifier for our collective existence as a species, a process he refers to as “planetary mediation.”

In the special section "Imagining Anew: Challenges of Representing the Anthropocene", Thomas Lekan offers a postcolonial critique of recent environmentalist literature and exhibitions that frame the Anthropocene using the NASA Apollo mission’s Earthrise (1968) and Blue Marble (1972) photographs from space.

In the special section "Imagining Anew: Challenges of Representing the Anthropocene," Alexa Weik von Mossner analyzes Dale Pendell’s speculative novel The Great Bay.

Andrew Whitehouse considers the semiotics of listening to birds in the Anthropocene by drawing on Kohn’s recent arguments on the semiotics of more-than-human relations and Ingold’s understanding of the world as a meshwork, and comparing the work of Bernie Krause with responses to the the Listening to Birds project.

Owain Jones raises questions about the relationships between self, time, memory, materiality, and place, using a non-representational creative approach based on image and textual collage.

Anna Svenson considers the epistemological implications of the digitization of the Directors’ Correspondence (DC) collection (1841-1928) at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. She concludes that care is needed to avoid replicating the invisible losses of extractive approaches to knowledge production, particularly in the context of collection-based biodiversity conservation.