Content Index

Frank de Vocht reviews The Invisible Rainbow: A History of Electricity and Life by Arthur Firstenberg.

Through a collection of 445 photographs taken from precisely the same places at intervals of months, years and decades,Die Zeit des Waldes [The forest over time] offers a stop-action look at the diversity of transformations within Germany’s forests.

Through ethnographic fieldwork in southern Lebanon, Vasiliki Touhouliotis examines the 2006 Lebanon-Israeli war’s environmental impact.

Petra Tjitske Kalshoven combines ethnographic studies with ornithological testimonies to present the re-creation and reenactment of the extinct great auk, or garefowl. The author aims to achieve contiguity with lost species through expressions and shaping of human perceptions and imaginations of past, and eventually future, environmental disasters.

Looking at Leanne Allison and Jeremy Mendes’s interactive documentary Bear 71 (2012), Katey Castellano shows how the environmental humanities can be employed to rearticulate scientific data as innovative multispecies stories.

The authors study the relationship between poverty and poaching using a sample of 173 self-admitted poachers dwelling in villages near Ruaha National Park in Tanzania.

This joint presentation by Varro Laszlo and Stefan Pfenninger for the ESC Symposium 2017: Global Energy Challenge provides a framework to understand the economics behind energy consumption in the past, present, and future.

Micheal Richardson investigates the impact of envisioning climate catastrophe in three works, namely George Miller’s film Mad Max: Fury Road (2015), Marina Zurkow’s animation Slurb (2009), and Briohny Doyle’s novel The Island Will Sink (2016).

The authors base this critique of the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation (NAMWC) on its narrow stakeholder focus and limited ideological representation.

Fedor Yakovlevich Alekseev’s painting of Karuselnaya square (now Teatralnaya square) during the 1824 flood.