Content Index

Owain Jones, a Professor of Environmental Humanities at Bath Spa University, offers ideas and resources about environmental humanities in this blog.

In episode 54 of Nature's Past, Professor Jennifer Bonnell talks to Sean Kheraj about her journey from her dissertation to publishing her book, Reclaiming the Don: An Environmental History of Toronto’s Don River Valley.

In episode 55 of Nature's Past, a podcast on Canadian environmental history, SEan Kheraj speaks to Jessica van Horssen about her new book, A Town Called Asbestos.

In episode 57 of Nature's Past, a podcast on Canadian environmental history, three historians based outside of Canada explain their research and reasons for studying Canadian environmental history to Sean Kheraj.

In episode 56 of Nature's Past, a podcast on Canadian environmental history, Sean Kheraj joins Joanna Dean and Christabelle Sethna to discuss their new book Animal Metropolis: Histories of Human-Animal Relations in Urban Canada and, more broadly, the history of animals and cities.

In episode 58 of Nature's Past, a podcast on Canadian environmental history, Sean Kheraj discusses key questions concerning the development of the field of Canadian environmental history with seven environmental historians.

Stephen Muecke's essay for the Living Lexicon for the Environmental Humanities focuses on the attachment of humans and the role this attachment has in the construction of "being."

Detailing the converging human and geological histories of Glacier National Park, US, this article traces the demise of the park's primary attraction, the glaciers.

In episode 59 of Nature's Past, a podcast on Canadian environmental history, Sean Kheraj, Jennifer Bonnell, and Owen Temby discuss their new roles as editors of the publication Papers in Canadian History and Environment. They also hear from Matt Dyce and Jonathan Peyton about their forthcoming paper in the new publication.

In episode 51 of Nature's Past, a podcast on Canadian environmental history, Sean Kheraj, Lisa Brady, Mark Hersey, and Liza Piper discuss whether environmental history should emphasize materialism and the use of environment as an analytical lens or proceed as a “big tent” that incorporates a wide range of scholarship regardless of methodology.