Content Index

In episode 48 of Nature's Past, a podcast on Canadian environmental history, Sean Kheraj speaks with Merle Massie about her book Forest Prairie Edge: Place History in Saskatchewan.

This special section edited by Franklin Ginn, Uli Beisel, and Maan Barua considers how multispecies flourishing works when the creatures are awkward, when togetherness is difficult, when vulnerability is in the making, and death is at hand.

By privileging music as a focus for applied ecology, Robin Ryan aims to deepen perspectives on the musical representation of land in an age of complex environmental challenge.

A map of the 1974 flood in Brisbane, Australia.

This painting by Leander Russ depicts a rescue operation during a flood in Vienna in 1847.

Through readings of the works of artist/sculptor Ilana Halperin and poet Alice Oswald, David Farrier explores the idea of Anthropocene as marked by haunted time.

Jean M. Langford explores different modes of interspecies communications at an urban parrot sanctuary, suggesting that humans can alter their interactions to ease parrots' distress.

By theorizing the temporalities of political-economic transformations as embodied in key conservationist and educational institutions, Erin Fitz-Henry argues that we can deepen our understanding of “worlds-otherwise” and work toward clarifying the institutional conditions that mitigate their flourishing.

John Ryan examines biopoetry experiments that encoded poetry into DNA, asking if biopoetry and the encipherment process are conceptual and methodological experimentations, or if they reflect ecological consciousness and ethical imperative for life.

Les Beldo proposes thinking about nonhuman contributions to production, including those taking place at the microbiological level, as labor, and offers an ethnographic description of the lives of broiler chickens.