society

Zeitgemäßer Lebensstil: Soziale Normen und Reformen

Zeitgemäßer Lebensstil: Soziale Normen und Reformen

In the early phase of the vegetarian movement, satirists playfully imagined how this diet and worldview affected different aspects of culture. Other cartoons make fun of the fact that vegetarianism quickly became a trend that was seen as sign of the Zeitgeist of the 1880s. Surprisingly, they overlooked the fact that vegetarianism was indeed intended as a sociocultural reform that could contribute to social and gender equality. This is from the German version of “Satirical Glimpses of the Cultural History of Vegetarianism.” For the English-language version of this exhibition, click here.

Fleischverbot: Lust und Frust, Askese und Doppelmoral

Fleischverbot: Lust und Frust, Askese und Doppelmoral

Since vegetarian societies began to spread and organize events in Germany, their missionary attitude and their supposed moral superiority have been ridiculed. Caricatures mocked the rigid rules of the vegetarians and their societies, accusing them of hypocrisy or of reinterpreting the self-imposed prohibitions according to their own needs and weaknesses. This is from the German version of “Satirical Glimpses of the Cultural History of Vegetarianism.” For the English-language version of this exhibition, click here.

Mensch, Tier und Natur – Vorstellungen natürlicher, harmonischer (Ko-)Existenz

Mensch, Tier und Natur – Vorstellungen natürlicher, harmonischer (Ko-)Existenz

In the nineteenth century, there was much debate about the question of which way of living could be regarded as “natural.” Caricatures on vegetarianism mock ideas of the “natural” relationship between animal and man, and draft utopian as well as dystopian visions of a vegetarian future. This is from the German version of “Satirical Glimpses of the Cultural History of Vegetarianism.” For the English-language version of this exhibition, click here.

Lifestyle and Zeitgeist: Social Norms and Reforms

Lifestyle and Zeitgeist: Social Norms and Reforms

In the early phase of the vegetarian movement, satirists playfully imagined how this diet and worldview affected different aspects of culture. Other cartoons make fun of the fact that vegetarianism quickly became a trend that was seen as sign of the Zeitgeist of the 1880s. Surprisingly, they overlooked the fact that vegetarianism was indeed intended as a sociocultural reform that could contribute to social and gender equality.

Meat Ban: Pleasure and Pain, Asceticism, and Hypocrisy

Meat Ban: Pleasure and Pain, Asceticism, and Hypocrisy

Since vegetarian societies began to spread and organize events in Germany, their missionary attitude and their supposed moral superiority have been ridiculed. Caricatures mocked the rigid rules of the vegetarians and their societies, accusing them of hypocrisy or of reinterpreting the self-imposed prohibitions according to their own needs and weaknesses.

Humans, Animals, and Nature: Ideas of a Natural and Harmonious (Co-)Existence

Humans, Animals, and Nature: Ideas of a Natural and Harmonious (Co-)Existence

In the nineteenth century, there was much debate about the question of which way of living could be regarded as “natural.” Caricatures on vegetarianism mock ideas of the “natural” relationship between animal and man, and draft utopian as well as dystopian visions of a vegetarian future.

“You Are What You Eat”: Stupid Vegetables and the Charm of the New

“You Are What You Eat”: Stupid Vegetables and the Charm of the New

While English satire magazines mocked vegetarianism since the 1840s, the first German caricatures appeared some 30 years later. Early drawings often imagined that a vegetarian would gradually transform into a plant. Other recurring topics are the assumed correlation between (meatless) nutrition and (peaceful, fragile) physical appearance and character, as well as the debate over whether a meat-rich or a meat-free diet was better for human health.

„Du bist, was du isst“ – Dummes Gemüse und der Reiz des Neuen und Anderen

„Du bist, was du isst“ – Dummes Gemüse und der Reiz des Neuen und Anderen

While English satire magazines mocked vegetarianism since the 1840s, the first German caricatures appeared some 30 years later. Early drawings often imagined that a vegetarian would gradually transform into a plant. Other recurring topics are the assumed correlation between (meatless) nutrition and (peaceful, fragile) physical appearance and character, as well as the debate over whether a meat-rich or a meat-free diet was better for human health. This is from the German version of “Satirical Glimpses of the Cultural History of Vegetarianism.” For the English-language version of this exhibition, click here.