Content Index

In this article for a Special Section on “Inheriting the Ecological Legacies of Settler Colonialism,” Alexander R. D. Zahara and Myra J. Hird explore the ways in which western and Inuit cosmologies differentially inform particular relationships with the inhuman, and “trash animals” in particular. They compare vermin control practiced in Canada’s waste sites with the freedom of ravens to explore waste sites within Inuit communities, arguing that waste and wasting exist within a complex set of historically embedded and contemporaneously contested neo-colonial structures and processes.

In this commentary, Stefan Helmreich considers how Hokusai’s famous woodblock print, The Great Wave, has recently been leveraged into commentaries upon the Anthropocene, and how the image has been adapted to speak to the contemporary human-generated global oceanic crisis.

In this Special Commentary Section titled “Replies to An Ecomodernist Manifesto,” edited by Eileen Crist and Thom Van Dooren, Rosemary-Claire Collard, Jessica Dempsey, and Juanita Sundberg critique the manifesto as fostering amnesia: amnesia about the uneven and violent nature of modernization as well as about the struggles that have underpinned efforts to alleviate inequality and violence.

In this Special Commentary Section titled “Replies to An Ecomodernist Manifesto,” edited by Eileen Crist and Thom Van Dooren, Bronislaw Szerszynski examines ecomodernism through the metaphor of “conscious uncoupling,” suggested in an essay by Habib Sadeghi and Sherry Sami.

In this Special Commentary Section titled “Replies to An Ecomodernist Manifesto,” edited by Eileen Crist and Thom Van Dooren, Eileen Crist considers the Manifesto’s point as view as one of humanism and freedom.

In this special issue on Multispecies Studies, Vinciane Despret and Michel Meuret discuss how humans and animals are making their own contributions to a new cosmoecology, creating cosmoecological connections and contributing to what Ghassan Hage has called alter-politics.

In this special issue on Multispecies Studies, Eben Kirksey, Dehlia Hannah, Charlie Lotterman, and Lisa Jean Moore conduct a performative experiment which blurs the boundaries between performance art, science, and ethnography. They conduct an outmoded pregnancy test with live Xenopus frogs to probe the contours of the gap between the biochemistry of being pregnant and the experience of recognizing oneself as pregnant.

From Waterton-Glacier International Park to the European Alps, and Lake Titicaca in Peru and Bolivia, the essays in Parks, Peace, and Partnership provide illustrative examples of the challenges and new solutions that are emerging around the world.

This book explores the development of ecocriticism in the context of Canadian literary studies.

This book explores how the need for electricity at the turn of the century affected and shaped Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada.