No Man's Zone

from Multimedia Library Collection:
Environmental Film Profiles (videos)

Fujiwara, Toshi. No Man's Zone. Japan/France: Doc & Film International, 2011. HDcam, 104 min.

The 40-year-old nuclear power station on the coast of Fukushima went into crisis after being struck by a tsunami on March 11, 2011. Within 24 hours, an evacuation order was issued for a 20 kilometer radius. This documentary is a journey within this "no man's zone" and surrounding regions where people have no choice but to continue to live, as well into time and history when the film encounters with the people who have or will be evacuated. For the zone to be decontaminated and returned to the people, nature itself will have to undergo an amputation. The 'zone' in this film is shown as both a place and a state of mind, and it claims to be a complex reflection on the relationship between images and fears, on being addicted to the apocalypse, on the ravaged relationship between man and nature. (Source: Adapted from Official Film Website and Press Kit)

© 2011 Doc & Film International. Trailer used with permission.

This film is available at the Rachel Carson Center Library (RCC, 4th floor, Leopoldstrasse 11a, 80802 Munich) for on-site viewing only. For more information, please contact library@rcc.lmu.de.

About the Environmental Film Profiles collection

Further readings: 
  • Caldicott, Helen, ed. Crisis Without End. The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe. New York: The New Press, 2014.
  • Geilhorn, Barbara and Kristina Iwata-Weickgenannt. Fukushima and the Arts: Negotiating Nuclear Disaster. Oxford: Routledge, 2017.
  • Kersten, Jens, Markus Vogt, and Frank Uekoetter eds. "Europe after Fukushima: German Perspectives on the Future of Nuclear Power." Special issue, RCC Perspectives 1 (2012).
  • Lochbaum, David, Edwin Lyman, Susan Q. Stranahan, and The Union of Concerned Scientists. Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster. New York: The New Press, 2014.
  • Murayama, Takehiko. "Social Impacts Induced by Radiation Risk in Fukushima." 32nd Annual Meeting of the International Association for Impact Assessment (2012).
  • Siegrist, Michael, and Vivianne Visschers. "How a Nuclear Power Plant Accident Influences Acceptance of Nuclear Power: Results of a Longitudinal Study Before and After the Fukushima Disaster." Risk Analysis 33, no. 2 (2013): 333–47.
  • The Independent Investigation Commission on the Fukushima Nuclear Accident, ed. The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Disaster: Investigating the Myth and Reality. London: Routledge Chapman & Hall, 2014.