John McNeill on "An Environmental History of the Industrial Revolution"

from Multimedia Library Collection:
Carson Fellow Portraits (videos)

Niepytalska, Marta, “Interview with John McNeill I: An Environmental History of the Industrial Revolution.” Carson Fellow Portraits. Directed by Alec Hahn. Filmed August 2011. MPEG video, 3:13. https://youtu.be/th_OXOKWZJY.

Niepytalska, Marta, “Carson Fellow John McNeill on ‘The Destruction of the Bison’ ”. Carson Fellow Portraits. Directed by Alec Hahn. Filmed August 2011. MPEG video, 3:22. https://youtu.be/7Di28i3c0Ms.

John McNeill studied at Swarthmore College and Duke University, where he completed a PhD in 1981. Since 1985, he has taught at Georgetown University, where he held the Cinco Hermanos Chair in Environmental and International Affairs before becoming a university professor in 2006. His research interests lie in the environmental history of the Mediterranean world, the tropical Atlantic world, and Pacific islands. His books are The Atlantic Empires of France and Spain, 1700–1765 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1985); The Mountains of the Mediterranean World (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992); Something New Under the Sun: An Environmental History of the Twentieth-Century World (New York: Norton, 2000), The Human Web: A Bird’s-eye View of World History (New York: Norton, 2003), co-authored with his father William H. McNeill; and most recently, Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620–1914 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010). He also edited or co-edited seven more books. In 2010, he was awarded the Toynbee Prize for “academic and public contributions to humanity.” In 2011, he became president of the American Society for Environmental History.

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Further readings: 
  • Isenberg, Andrew C. The Destruction of the Bison: An Environmental History, 1750–1920. Studies in Environment and History 18. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.